U.S. Scholars Information Page

Meet the US Scholars

2016

2015

University of Wisconsin, Madison
University of Wisconsin, Madison
University of Wisconsin, Madison
University of Wisconsin, Madison
University of Wisconsin, Madison
University of Wisconsin, Madison
State University of New York
University of Wisconsin, Madison
University of Wisconsin, Madison
University of Wisconsin, Madison

2010

University of Wisconsin, Madison
University of Wisconsin, Madison
University of Wisconsin, Madison

2009

University of Wisconsin, Madison
University of Wisconsin, Madison
University of Wisconsin, Madison
University of Wisconsin, Madison
University of Wisconsin, Madison
University of Wisconsin, Madison

Video Testimonials

Institutions in India for US Scholars

Researchers in India

We use zebrafish, a small fresh water tropical fish endemic to the Ganges, as our model system. The embryonic and larval stages of these fish are transparent allowing for direct visual observation of developing internal organs including the brain. We employ a suite of techniques to tease out the circuitry responsible for generating swimming in developing and more mature zebrafish. We record electrical activity from individual spinal and brain neurons using extracellular and whole-cell patch clamp techniques. We record activity from populations of neurons simultaneously using calcium imaging. We generate transgenic zebrafish to express proteins of interest in particular neurons. This allows us to selectively ablate and also to electrically activate/inactivate specific populations at will. Using these cutting edge tools and technologies, we hope to throw light on the development of neural circuits and the neural basis of locomotion.

Dr Sutapa B Neogi is a public health specialist actively engaged in research and teaching at Indian Institute of Public Health- Delhi (IIPHD), Public Health Foundation of India (PHFI) as an Additional Professor. An MBBS from Nil Ratan Sircar Medical College, Calcutta and MD in Community Medicine from Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh, and Diplomate of National Board (DNB) in Maternal and Child Health, she has excellent academic credentials. She received the ‘Kataria Memorial Gold Medal’ for being the best outgoing student of PGIMER, Chandigarh. She has a rich experience in public health, starting a career as a resident followed by consultancy for UNICEF and currently a faculty at IIPH Delhi. She is coordinating two academic programs at PHFI- Integrated MSc and PhD in Clinical Research and Post Graduate Diploma in Management of Reproductive and Child Health Programmes. She is a part of the research team for projects supported by Government of India and developmental partners. She is a reviewer of many national and international journals.

Biophysics of synaptic transmission in normal function and pathological states.

Our broad goal is to understand the contribution of each of the molecular pathways involved in synaptic transmission to higher level function. The approach in our lab is to devise detailed biophysical computational models that allow for ‘In-Silico’ experiments and make testable predictions.

Rajan Rawal is a faculty member at CEPT University. He is a licenced architect, graduated from School of

Architecture, Institute of Environmental Design, Vallabh Vidyanagar. He worked with Vastu Shilpa

Foundation for Studies and Research in Environmental Design as research associate before joining

Faculty of Design, CEPT University. In the past, he served as Post Graduate coordinator at CEPT

University and Head of Undergrad program at Faculty of Design. He teaches energy efficient built

habitat, energy modelling, energy policy at post graduate level. His work emphasis is on ‘energy

performance of human habitat’ and ‘architectural science education’.

 

My primary research interest is CFD and its applications. I am also interested in numerical analysis and numerical solution of PDE in general.

In one of the most intriguing examples of biological wizardry, in every cell, every second, thousands of proteins self-pack into the unique shapes that hold the key to their function. In essence, a freshly-formed chain of amino acids bends, loops, twists, coils and collapses on itself to produce the finished design. We know that these rearrangements are determined by chemical attractions between the amino acids. But in stark contrast to our knowledge of the digital precision by which DNA codes the sequence of amino acids, the chemical forces that direct folding act in an incompletely understood, nebulous way, much as the weather is ruled by physical processes. A predictive model for protein structure remains one of science's holiest grails, promising incredible benefits throughout the biomedical sciences. In our lab the quest is focused on observations of real instances of protein folding, unfolding and misfolding, a complementary and ground-truthing approach to algorithm-based models. Using small proteins (e.g. barstar, monellin), and techniques that monitor shape changes with nano-to-microsecond resolution, we are answering questions fundamental to solving the self-packing puzzle: Do proteins take shape gradually or in fits and starts? Is there only one folding sequence for each protein? How sensitive is folding to cellular conditions? What comes first - an "outline" of the shape or its details? We are also applying our expertise to protein unfolding and most recently to misfolding - an all-too-common problem that can cause proteins to aggregate into fibrillar masses, most tragically causing the neurodegeneration of Alzheimer's disease.

Gondi Kondaiah Ananthasuresh is an Indian mechanical engineer and Professor at the Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru, India.

Research interests:

  • Studying novel microbial genes during stress and infection
  • Understanding the host encoded immune responses

The overall objective our laboratory is to understand biological responses to different stimuli. For this purpose, we utilize microbial systems as well as the host encoded immune system. Over the years, we have established a diverse array of models and expertise that help us to understand the roles of various genes and signals in modulating microbial and host encoded responses. Broadly, the twin areas of interests of our laboratory are:

Professor D Balasubramanian joined LVPEI’s Prof Brien Holden Eye Research Centre after an illustrious scientific career, which included positions such as Director, Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology, and Professor and Dean, University of Hyderabad. He was honoured by the Government of India with the Padma Shri in 2002, and has received several other awards from professional and institutional bodies. Notable among them are the Kalinga Prize for the popularization of science from UNESCO, the Third World Academy of Sciences Award for Basic Medical Science, and the Chevalier de l’Ordre National du Merite from the President of France. Prof Balasubramanian’s research focuses on the biology of eye diseases. He has over 160 publications in national and international journals and has authored three books. He is a member of several editorial boards and serves on a range of national and international scientific committees. Currently, he is President of the Indian Academy of Sciences, and Secretary General of the Academy of Sciences for the Developing World (TWAS), Trieste, Italy. In January 2016 he retired from the post of Research Director, Prof Brien Holden Eye Research Centre.

Avadhesha Surolia received BSc (1970) from Jodhpur University, MSc (1972) from MS University and PhD (1976) from Madras University. He worked as Scientist (1976-81), Indian Institute of Chemical Biology, Kolkata; Assistant Professor (1981-86), Associate Professor (1986-91), Professor (1991- ), Chairman, Molecular Biophysics Unit (2000-06), all at Indian Institute of Science (IISC), Bangalore; and Director, National Institute of Immunology, New Delhi (2006- ). 
 

Research Interests
Kinematics, dynamics, control and design of robots and other computer controlled mechanical systems,
Theoretical and numerical investigations of non-linear dynamical systems,
Kinematics of parallel mechanisms and manipulators, and
Design of mechanical systems, bio-medical devices and CAD/CAM

Dr. Aruna is an Associate Professor at Indian Institute of Public Health- Delhi. She is the lead faculty for “Behavioural and Social Sciences” at the Institute. In her academic role, she developed curriculum for ‘Qualitative Research Methods’ in Research Methods course for Distance Learning courses on Public Health Nutrition and Management of Reproductive and Child Health Programmes. She also developed course materials for distance learning course at PHFI on ‘Intensive Professional Program in Sexually Transmitted Infections and HIV’. In addition, she has been mentoring students in their thesis projects and in meeting their academic goals.

She has developed and delivered training programs in the areas of Qualitative Research Methods in Public Health as well as Ethics in Public Health. She has developed successful research/grant proposals and participated in research projects on Child Protection, Harm Reduction for injecting drug users, Nutrition programme in tribal areas in India with National and International collaborators. She co-authored a book on Family Planning and published number of articles in national and international journals.

We will be using Drosophila as model system to address how memory is maintained over time. We will also work with Drosophila models of neurodegenerative diseases and fragile-X. We will be using genetics, cell biology, biochemistry, imaging, next generation sequencing and behavior as tools in our work.

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